The Economics of Privacy

Friday, December 2, 2011, 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
@ Wittemyer Courtroom, Wolf Law Building, University of Colorado

Post-Event Coverage

For a report summarizing the conference written by Therese Kerfoot Click Here

Video

To view video recordings of the event, click here.

In Cooperation With TechFreedom and the Federal Communications Bar Association

Information privacy has become one of the most important and hotly debated topics in technology policy. For example, personalization is a key engine driving Internet innovation and economic growth, and the emerging business models of many companies are built upon the collection and analysis of personal information from their users. The increased collection and use of this information, however, can sometimes threaten individual privacy.

Inside these companies, debates about information privacy focus most often on questions about markets and economics: Who owns the data? Have the users consented? Can't robust notice-and-choice strike the best balance between business need and privacy? Often is heard the argument that users are perfectly capable of revealing the amount of privacy they prefer through their market decisions, which is used to oppose calls for laws that promise more privacy than the market delivers as paternalistic.

In the meantime, despite the fact that information privacy represents one of the most exciting, rapidly growing areas of legal scholarship, information privacy law scholars rarely express any faith in market principles, when they talk about markets at all. Government regulators seem a bit more conflicted, with recent pronouncements from the Commerce Department, FTC, and Congress each premised largely on market-based, notice-and-choice principles, but recognizing the limits of markets.

Join the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship on Friday, December 2, 2011, as it brings representatives from these three groups together to debate the economics of privacy. Joining them will be an interdisciplinary group of leading thinkers from other disciplines, such as economists studying the behavioral economics of privacy and computer scientists who specialize in human-computer interaction studying the limits of notice-and-choice.

In keynote speeches, an overview panel, and other panels focused on some of the most active areas of debate - behavioral advertising, social networks, facial recognition, and location privacy - we will study the promise and the limits of markets, asking questions such as: Should information privacy laws require opt-in or opt-out rules? How well has the FTC's focus on privacy policies fared? What are best practices for terms of service? What are the pros and cons of a do-not-track system, and should it be backed by law? Do smart phone providers solicit enough meaningful consent to track user location? How do European regulators differ from their American counterparts in their treatment of markets?

Many of the conference attendees will present academic articles, to be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal on Telecommunications and High Technology Law.

Welcome
9:00am - 9:15am
  • Paul Ohm
    Associate Professor of Law
    University of Colorado
  • Phil Weiser
    Dean
    University of Colorado Law School
    Executive Director
    Silicon Flatirons Center
Opening Keynote Address
9:15am - 9:45am
  • Alessandro Acquisti
    Associate Professor
    Information Technology and Public Policy
    Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University
Panel One: Is There a Market Failure for Information Privacy?
9:45am - 11:15am
  • Alessandro Acquisti
    Associate Professor
    Information Technology and Public Policy
    Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Julie Cohen
    Professor of Law
    Georgetown University
  • Lorrie Cranor
    Associate Professor
    Institute for Software Research, Engineering & Public Policy
    Carnegie Mellon University
  • Scott Peppet
    Professor of Law
    University of Colorado
  • Lior Strahilevitz
    Deputy Dean and Sidley Austin
    Professor of Law
    University of Chicago
Moderator
  • Paul Ohm
    Associate Professor of Law
    University of Colorado
Keynote Address
11:15am - 11:45am
  • Joseph Farrell
    Director of the Bureau of Economics
    Federal Trade Commission
Lunch
11:45am - 1:00pm
Panel Two: The Economics of Behavioral Advertising
1:00pm - 2:15pm
  • Eric Goldman
    Associate Professor
    Director of the High Tech Law Institute
    Santa Clara Law School
  • Laura Kornish
    Associate Professor
    Leeds School of Business
    University of Colorado
  • Seth Levine
    Managing Director
    Foundry Group
  • Aleecia McDonald
    Fellow
    Stanford Center for Internet and Society
  • Catherine Tucker
    Douglas Drane Career Development Professor in IT & Management and Associate Professor of Marketing
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Moderator
  • Ryan Calo
    Assistant Professor of Law
    University of Washington
Break
2:15pm - 2:30pm
Panel Three: The Economics of the Cutting Edge
2:30pm - 3:45pm
  • Jeff Carter
    Chief Strategy Officer
    EyeLock
  • Fernando Laguarda
    Vice President, External Affairs and Policy Counselor
    Time Warner Cable
  • Geoff Manne
    Executive Director
    International Center for Law & Economics (ICLE)
    Lecturer in Law
    Lewis & Clark Law School
  • Peter Swire
    Co-Chair
    W3C Tracking Protection Working Group
    Professor of Law
    Ohio State University
Moderator
  • Harry Surden
    Associate Professor of Law
    University of Colorado
A Conversation with FTC Commissioner Julie Brill
3:45pm - 4:30pm
Moderator
  • Paul Ohm
    Associate Professor of Law
    University of Colorado

Video

To view the video of this event click here.

Confernce Summary

For a report summarizing the conference written by Therese Kerfoot Click Here